19 - 21 October, 2016 | Hilton Sydney, NSW

Conference Day One: Thursday, 20 October 2016

Day 1

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8:40 AM Keynote Panel Discussion: The Future of Teaching and Learning: Assessing and Innovating with the Curriculum, Learning Space and Blended Learning to Remain Competitive

Dr Panos Vlachopoulos , Associate Dean Learning and Teaching (Acting), Macquarie University

Professor James Arvanitakis , Prime Minister's University Teacher of the Year Award Winner 2012, Dean, Graduate Research School, Western Sydney University

Professor Birgit Lohmann , Senior Deputy Vice Chancellor, University of the Sunshine Coast

The development and design of learning spaces, becoming innovative in teaching and learning through a blended curriculum, and producing work ready graduates are closely interlinked and all critical elements that will determine the competitiveness of a university. Traditional tertiary structures and accreditation criteria are posing a threat to the adaptability and flexibility of the tertiary sector in meeting student and employer demands. This panel discussion will set the tone for the next two days, assessing the status-quo, what needs to change, and how to get there.  
  • Preparing for tomorrow’s learner: the best way to become agile and implement flexible processes to keep up with a rapidly transforming environment  
  • Tertiary disruption: mapping the threat to the tertiary sector and overcoming the disruptors – what needs to happen? 
  • Internal shifts: How can we push innovation and change internally to remove barriers? 
  • Collaboration: what needs to happen to develop a more collaborative approach within the Australian tertiary sector? 
  • Envisioning success and reaping the benefits: If all this is achieved, what does the future of the tertiary sector Look like?
Dr Panos Vlachopoulos
Dr Panos Vlachopoulos
Associate Dean Learning and Teaching (Acting)
Macquarie University
Professor James Arvanitakis
Professor James Arvanitakis
Prime Minister's University Teacher of the Year Award Winner 2012, Dean, Graduate Research School
Western Sydney University
Professor Birgit Lohmann
Professor Birgit Lohmann
Senior Deputy Vice Chancellor
University of the Sunshine Coast

9:40 AM Educating Students in a Time of Disruption: Becoming Innovative and Creating an Internal Shift to Drive The Future of Universities

Professor James Arvanitakis , Prime Minister's University Teacher of the Year Award Winner 2012, Dean, Graduate Research School, Western Sydney University

With an estimated seven career changes in today’s students’ lifetime, the age of the ‘four year career’ is forcing universities and other education institutions to adapt, diversify and respond. Educators need to prepare students for such an environment by becoming flexible and keep up with demand for multi-disciplinary and modal thinking in a rapidly transforming employment market. While innovations within the education industry have included Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), creative blended learning environments and industry/university partnerships, a university looks today similar to what it did a generation ago. The question is, 'what is next?' How do we prepare for the impact of a major disruption as an 'Uber' university?
This opening presentation will set the scene by:
  • Looking to the future of education: embracing change to improve the learning experience
  • Delivery of disciplinary content and developing new graduate attributes: incorporating skills into a blended curriculum 
  • Creating the internal shift to encourage and develop a flexible and innovate curriculum 
  • Redefining the roles of a next generation university – what does an Uber University look like? 
  • Using Blended Learning as a driver of change
Professor James Arvanitakis
Professor James Arvanitakis
Prime Minister's University Teacher of the Year Award Winner 2012, Dean, Graduate Research School
Western Sydney University

10:30 AM Speed Networking

10:50 AM Morning Tea

11:20 AM Developing a Vision and Introducing More Formative Assessment to Improve Achievement and Feedback

Professor Darrell Evans , Vice-Provost (Learning and Teaching), Monash University

Over the last 2 years, Monash University has been extremely active with regard to rethinking about assessment, having developed a unit wide group and rewritten policy and procedures surrounding curriculum, accreditation and assessment. Monash has also been running pilots with e-exams and has implemented two sub-groups on online assessment and evidence based assessment.  
  • Designing around assessment: adopting a design thinking approach to purely online and blended courses
  • Developing assessment alongside learning outcomes and demonstrating these  
  • Writing policies and procedures around assessment and learning outcomes  
  • Establishing a vision and completely transforming assessment  
  • The realities of quality of assessment and embedding into courses.  
  • Making assessment meaningful to reduce student workload  
  • Avoiding regurgitation of knowledge and replacing it with sills attributes 
  • Encouraging people to think differently  
  • Summative assessment vs. formative assessment
  • Allowing student assess for eLearning: gauging where student is at and providing quality feedback
Professor Darrell Evans
Professor Darrell Evans
Vice-Provost (Learning and Teaching)
Monash University

12:00 PM Skills of a Digital Society: Producing Work Ready Graduates Through Transforming the Curriculum and Assessment

Dr Panos Vlachopoulos , Associate Dean Learning and Teaching (Acting), Macquarie University

Professional wisdom may be a more suitable approach than employability when it comes to the higher education agenda. The big challenge for educators is not only how to educate students to get a job now (the over-emphasized employability agenda), but perhaps most importantly how to start preparing students to be professionally wise. Universities are having to develop the ability to instil employability skills in their education. Critical thinking, reflective practice, ethics, and learning democracy are just a few of the skills universities are seriously considering adding in curricula in order to ensure students are equipped to make the right decisions about what professions and jobs are needed, and towards what direction the professions should grow in order to promote our wellbeing and put technology in just use.  
  • Rethinking the curriculum to integrate employability skills 
  • Assessing work ready graduates  
  • Changing the structure and focus of a degree to prepare students for their future  
  • Adapting to student and employer demands: enabling skills based learning  
  • Strategies to override the traditional tertiary teaching and learning model
Dr Panos Vlachopoulos
Dr Panos Vlachopoulos
Associate Dean Learning and Teaching (Acting)
Macquarie University

12:40 PM Lunch

1:40 PM A Future Focused Approach to Aligning Learning, Assessment and Accreditation

Kim Flintoff , Learning Futures Advisor, Curtin University



Universities around the world are reviewing their approaches to many of their traditional and core business practices.  The area of assessments and credentials are beginning to show signs of imminent transformation.  This session will examine how the shift to Digital Learning creates a cascade of effects that begin to demand new ways of assessing, collecting evidence of and recognising learning.  Topics discussed will include: Work Integrated Learning, Micro-credentials, Blockchain technologies, gamified and games-based learning, digital badges, recognition of extra curricular learning, and the connections between traditional modes of study and MOOC/SPOC programs.

Kim Flintoff
Learning Futures Advisor
Curtin University

2:20 PM Panel Discussion: Combatting Corporate Credentials Through Developing Micro-Credentials and Cross-Crediting Credentials with Other Universities in Online Open Courses

Dr. Katy McDevitt , Program Manager, AdelaideX, University of Adelaide

Warren Midgley , Head of School (Linguistics, Adult and Specialist Education), University of Southern Queensland

With a variety of discrepancies and differences in units and credentials from Australian Universities, assessing and accrediting students who have completed online open courses, is a challenge. This panel discussion will delve into how do universities add other external credentials to their structures and if the student has done some courses online or elsewhere, will the university give credit for that? It will also look at how to design micro-credentials tailored to the student and their needs.

Exploring micro-credentials from a student/design thinking perspective How do you balance a need to flex to meet students' desires for chunkable, portable evidence of learning, with the longstanding degree models that still make up the mainstream of the HE offer? What can we learn from the open learning community as we seek to become more adaptive as organisations?
Dr. Katy McDevitt
Program Manager, AdelaideX
University of Adelaide
Warren Midgley
Head of School (Linguistics, Adult and Specialist Education)
University of Southern Queensland
  • Adapting class based content to online content and assessment  
  • Assessing group presentation 
  • Ensuring authenticity of assessment  
  • Learning design: working on equivalents that still meet academic accreditation and engage students  
  • Building an equivalent that doesn’t afflict with the accreditation piece 
  • Effectively developing the content and structure of a unit

3:40 PM Afternoon Tea

Hackathon
4:10 PM Combined Plenary Session – Hackathon: Disruption in the Academy

Jan Golembiewski , Adjunct Professor: Design and Health Industry Engagement and Research, Queensland University of Technology

Until now, the biggest challenge in university education was the Enlightenment, when in the late 17th Century, academics were forced to put away their treatises on religious doctrine and adapt to the scientific method. But now we’re seeing far greater disruptive forces, led by the democratisation of knowledge, by demands for work-ready graduates and by a wave of near total transparency: now anyone can look into your classrooms and see that university isn’t always what it’s cracked up to be.

This interactive workshop will involve the whole audience and will look at the big decisions that will affect universities over the next century and what we can do to prepare. This future-facing session will challenge the status quo by asking us to examine our approach to education delivery, our assumptions and our solutions against what we already know to be the future of higher education, and what we can expect over the horizon.
Jan Golembiewski
Adjunct Professor: Design and Health Industry Engagement and Research
Queensland University of Technology